Why It Is Important to Rescue Pugs and Adopt Them

rescue and adopt a pug

According to National estimates:

  • The number of dogs entering animal shelters nationwide each year is approximately 3.9 million.
  • Each year 1.2 million dogs get euthanized
  • Approximately 1.4 million dogs are adopted each year
  • About 542,000 dogs enter shelters as strays and are returned to their owners
  • Approximately 35% of dogs entering shelters are adopted, 31% die of euthanasia, while 26% of strays are returned to their owners.
  • More animals are surrendered as strays than are relinquished by their owners, and approximately twice as many enter shelters as strays.

If these facts are not enough for you and you are still debating between buying a pug from a breeder or a store and rescuing or adopting a pug, know that you will not necessarily get a healthier, genetically better, perfectly loving one pug companion from the breeder or store.

It is a fact that because of financial gain and lack of care and knowledge, many breeders are putting out pugs in great numbers with genetic defects, passing on illnesses, allergies, and other health problems of which many are not curable. It used to be way back that breeders had champions and only bred champions; this is rarely the case now.

By buying from a non-champion breeder, you are supporting these malpractices. If you are not showing pugs, you would not buy from a champion breeder. Therefore, in this case, you can be part of the solution of helping the needy pugs that have been rescued from the pug organizations listed here and adopting a pug with them.

From my personal experience of 11 years saving pugs, I could not tell the difference between a rescued one and a pug bought from a non-champion breeder. As a matter of fact, the first pug I rescued, Teddy Bear, was up there in the quality breeding lines of champs. He was minutes from being euthanized and proved to be my biggest friend, companion. And in part because of Teddy’s rescue, Pug Rescue of San Diego was formed, raising thousands of dollars and homes for thousands of ready to adopt pugs.

PUG RESCUE

ADOPT A PUG FROM THESE ORGANIZATIONS
IDAHO
Pug Pals, Greater Boise
Southwest Idaho Pug Rescue
ILLINOIS
Northern Illinois Pug Rescue
Midwest Pug Rescue
IL-MO Pug Rescue
INDIANA
See Ohio Pug Rescue (OH)
See Kentuckiana Pug Rescue (KY)
IOWA
unknown
KANSAS
Midwest Pug Rescue
KENTUCKY
Kentuckiana Pug Rescue
LOUISIANA
unknown
MAINE
See Pug Rescue of New England (NE)
See Green Mtn Pug Rescue (VT)
MARYLAND
See Mid-Atlantic Pug Rescue (NC)
MASSACHUSETTS
See Pug Rescue of New England (NE)
MICHIGAN
Pug Rescue Network
Michigan Pug Rescue
MINNESOTA
Midwest Pug Rescue
MISSISSIPPI
unknown
MISSOURI
Southeast Pug Rescue & Adoption
Midwest Pug Rescue
See IL-MO Pug Rescue (IL)
MONTANA
unknown
NEBRASKA
Pug Partners
NEVADA
PugSavers
Southern Nevada Pug Rescue
NEW HAMPSHIRE / NEW ENGLAND
Pug Rescue of New England
See Green Mtn Pug Rescue (VT)
See Curly Tail Pug Rescue (NY)
NEW JERSEY
See Curly Tail Pug Rescue (NY)
NEW MEXICO
unknown
NEW YORK
Buffalo Pugs & Small Breeds
NORTH CAROLINA
Pug Rescue of North Carolina
Mid-Atlantic Pug Rescue
NORTH DAKOTA
unknown
OHIO
Ohio Pug Rescue, Inc
OKLAHOMA
OK – Homeward Bound Pugs
OREGON
Pacific Pug Rescue
PENNSYLVANIA
Guardian Angels Pug Rescue
Southwest PA Pugs with Special Needs
Delaware Valley Pug Club

How much does a rescued pug cost

Adopting a Pug is always cheaper than buying one.

Adoption fees range from $0 to over $500. It’s possible to adopt for free, for a relatively low cost, or for several hundred dollars. The organizations that rescue and shelter dogs and puppies must provide food and medical care, and sometimes train and rehab the dogs and puppies before they can be adopted.

In many cases, the adoption fee will also cover spaying or neutering the pugs. Usually, puppies cost more than senior dogs.

If you adopt a dog, you are not just purchasing a pet; you are also adopting a part of your family.

When adopting a dog, it’s important to consider what kind of lifestyle you want for him or her. The amount that you spend will depend on how active and social your new pup will need to be.

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